Fear, shame or embarrassment may make it difficult for nymphomaniacs to seek treatment for nymphomania, but it’s important to get help. Treatment typically involves psychotherapy, medications and self-help groups. A primary goal of treatment of conventional forms of nymphomania is to help you manage urges and reduce excessive behaviors while maintaining healthy sexual activities.

Nymphomania Medications

There’s little scientific research about using psychiatric medications to treat nymphomania. However, some small studies have suggested that certain medications may be helpful. Which medication is best for you depends on your overall situation and other conditions you may have, such as depression or obsessive-compulsive disorder. You may benefit from taking a combination of medications. And you may have to try several medications to find the one that works best for you with the fewest side effects. Medications to consider include:

Antidepressants – Those most commonly used to treat nymphomania are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). These include fluoxetine (Prozac, Prozac Weekly), paroxetine (Paxil, Paxil CR), sertraline (Zoloft) and others. Because SSRIs can cause sexual side effects, you may be tempted to stop taking them. Talk to your doctor about your concerns and coping with side effects.

Anti-androgens – These are medications that inhibit the biological effects of androgens — sex hormones. They may reduce sexual urges, erections and fantasies. They’re often used only in cases of nymphomania that is dangerous to others. (Consult certified doctor before taking any medication)

Other medications – Numerous other medications also have been used to treat nymphomania and coexisting problems, such as depression, anxiety and substance abuse. These medications include mood stabilizers such as lithium, anti-anxiety medications, and Naltrexone, which blocks the part of your brain that feels pleasure with certain addictive behaviors.

Psychotherapy
Several forms of psychotherapy may help nymphomania. These include:

Psychodynamic psychotherapy – Focuses on increasing your awareness of unconscious thoughts and behaviors, developing new insights into your motivations, and resolving conflicts.

Cognitive behavior therapy – Helps you identify unhealthy, negative beliefs and behaviors and replace them with healthy, positive ones.

Group therapy – You meet regularly with a group, under guidance of a mental health professional, to explore emotions and relationships.

Family therapy or marriage counseling – Nymphomania affects the entire family, so it’s often helpful to involve your partner or children in joint therapy sessions.

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