Although many people associate a bladder infection with women, all humans are actually at risk for developing this infection. There are numerous causes for bladder infections, as well as urinary tract infections. Let’s take a look at some of the most common urinary tract infection in women, men and children.
Men

Although male urinary tract infections are not as many bladder infections as women, thanks in part to the length of their urethra, which makes it harder for bacteria to reach the bladder, most men will deal with the issue at least once in their lives. Urinary tract infections in men can be incredibly painful for a man, so it is important to understand what causes a urinary tract infection.

First, let’s look at an STD that is becoming increasingly more common and is one of the top causes of bladder infections in men. Chlamydia trachomatis is the second most popular bacteria that can lead to a UTI, and as the name suggests, it is related to the STD known as Chlamydia. You can get this STD through unprotected intercourse. Once the bacteria is present, it travels up the urethra, until it reaches the bladder. After it arrives there, a bladder infection will commonly ensue.

It is important for men that are afflicted with this STD to understand that they can pass the bacteria on to their partner. For women, this is also the second most popular bacteria responsible for a UTI.

By far however, the most common cause of male bladder infection is the bacteria called e-coli. This bacteria is present in most digestive tracts and improper hygiene or specific sex acts can increase the risks of having this bacteria cause a bladder infection in men. Once again, this can also be transmitted during sex, to both partners.

Kidney stones are a common affliction for many man, and one of the usual side effects of this problem is a UTI. The stone creates a blockage in the urethra, which allows bacteria to build up, therby causing a bladder infection. This is a more difficult situation to handle since hygiene does not play as large of a role. Every human has bacteria in their system, but when it builds up, it can easily cause bladder infections in men and women.

Children

By far, the most common cause of urinary tract infections in children is improper hygiene. For children that are just starting their bathroom training, it can be difficult for them to grasp the necessity that they must wipe in the proper direction, from front to back, in order to keep clean. They may have coordination issues at first, and it is quite common for children to experience a UTI during this stage of their lives.

Even if they are past this point in their training, if parents do not effectively monitor hygiene practices, frequent infections can occur. Since this is such a common cause for bladder infections in children, parents must really drive this particular lesson home with their children.

A lack of hand washing can also lead to urinary tract infections in children. They may not be as diligent as they could be, and it is very easy for them to spread the before mentioned bacteria, e-coli to themselves as well as one another. Children must be taught that hand washing is absolutely mandatory to avoid this type of infection.
Women

By far, women have to deal with UTI’s much more frequently than man. There are many causes for female bladder infections that are similar to what men face. Sexual activity is usually the number one issue and cause of bladder infections for women. Whether the woman is using a diaphragm as birth control, or the act itself pushes bacteria into the urethral area, there are many risk factors that women face.

Although these can usually be treated with medication, there are times when this may be complicated by other factors. For example, treating a bladder infection during pregnancy can be risky. Some medications pose a danger to the fetus, so proper medical care is necessary when this is the case.

For some women, urinary tract infection during pregnancy can be attributed to frequent bladder infections. The bladder may not be able to empty all the way, depending on the location of the fetus, and this can lead to a build up of bacteria. Inflammation starts and before long, a full blown bladder infection can occur. If you are pregnant and experiencing frequent UTI’s, it is best to discuss your options with your doctor.

Other causes of bladder infections in women include as we mentioned before, the use of a diaphragm as well as some sexual practices. When a diaphragm is used as a contraceptive, it effectively blocks some debris, which can lead to a build up of bacteria. This bacteria travels up the urethral tract, eventually stopping in the bladder, where it causes a full blown bladder infection.

Sexual relations with men that are infected with the chlamydia trachomatis bacteria can also cause bladder infections in women. This is associated with a common STD that we mentioned earlier in this article. The main issue at hand is that many men do not experience many symptoms with this SID and they may not be aware that they are spreading it.

Certain physical conditions can also be the cause of bladder infections in women. For example, those that suffer from diabetes are usually quite likely to have at least a few bladder infections on a regular basis. Other conditions that suppress the immune system, such as AIDS, can also be blamed as a frequent cause of urinary tract infections in women.

One of the most elusive causes of bladder infections in women may actually be genetics. Although the theory is still being studied, doctors have found that patients with family members that had frequent UTI’s are much more likely to suffer them as well. Research is continuing on this premise, but for now, if you do have a family history of dealing with UTI’s, it is important to let your doctor know.

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