Diabetes types - type 1 and type 1 diabetes

Insulin is an animal hormone with extensive effects on both metabolism and several other body systems (eg, vascular compliance). When present, it causes most of the body’s cells to take up glucose from the blood (including liver, muscle, and fat tissue cells), storing it as glycogen in the liver and muscle, and stops use of fat as an energy source. When insulin is absent (or low), glucose is not taken up by most body cells absorbed and the body begins to use fat as an energy source. As its level is a central metabolic control mechanism, its status is also used as a signal to other body systems (such as amino acid uptake by body cells). Generally, it has several other anabolic effects throughout the body. When control of insulin levels fails, Diabetes mellitus results.

Diabetes can cause many complications. Acute complications (hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis or nonketotic hyperosmolar coma) may occur if the disease is not adequately controlled. Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease (doubled risk), chronic renal failure, retinal damage (which can lead to blindness), nerve damage (of several kinds), and microvascular damage, which may cause impotence and poor healing. Poor healing of wounds, particularly of the feet, can lead to gangrene, which may require amputation. Adequate treatment of diabetes, as well as increased emphasis on blood pressure control and lifestyle factors (such as not smoking and keeping a healthy body weight), may improve the risk profile of most aforementioned complications. In the developed world, diabetes is the most significant cause of adult blindness in the non-elderly and the leading cause of non-traumatic amputation in adults, and diabetic nephropathy is the main illness requiring renal dialysis.

Diabetes Types and Treatment

The body does not produce insulin. Some people may refer to this type as insulin-dependent diabetes, juvenile diabetes, or early-onset diabetes. People usually develop type 1 diabetes before their 40th year, often in early adulthood or teenage years.

Type 1 diabetes is nowhere near as common as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 10% of all diabetes cases are type 1. Patients with type 1 diabetes will need to take insulin injections for the rest of their life. They must also ensure proper blood-glucose levels by carrying out regular blood tests and following a special diet.

In other cases, the body does not produce enough insulin for proper function, or the cells in the body do not react to insulin (insulin resistance). Approximately 90% of all cases of diabetes worldwide are type 2.

Some people may be able to control their type 2 diabetes symptoms by losing weight, following a healthy diet, doing plenty of exercise, and monitoring their blood glucose levels. However, type 2 diabetes is typically a progressive disease – it gradually gets worse – and the patient will probably end up have to take insulin, usually in tablet form.

Symptoms of Diabetes

  • Frequent urination.
  • Excessive thirst.
  • Increased hunger.
  • Weight loss.
  • Tiredness.
  • Lack of interest and concentration.
  • A tingling sensation or numbness in the hands or feet.
  • Blurred vision.

symptoms of diabetes type 1 and type 2

Classification of Diabetes

The principal two idiopathic forms of diabetes mellitus are known as types 1 and 2.
Type-1 diebetes mellitus is characterized by loss of the insulin-producing beta cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, leading to a deficiency of insulin.The main cause of this beta cell loss is a T-cell mediated autoimmune attack. There is no known preventative measure that can be taken against type 1 diabetes.

Diabetes Treatment

The principal treatment of type 1 diabetes, even from the earliest stages, is replacement of insulin combined with careful monitoring of blood glucose levels using blood testing monitors.Type 1 treatment must be continued indefinitely. Treatment does not significantly impair normal activities, if sufficient patient training, awareness, appropriate care, discipline in testing and dosing of insulin is taken. However, treatment is burdensome for patients, and insulin is replaced in a non-physiological manner, and is therefore far from ideal. The average glucose level for the type 1 patient should be as close to normal (80 to 120 mg/dl, 4 to 6 mmol/l) as is safely possible.]

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized differently due to insulin resistance or reduced insulin sensitivity, combined with reduced insulin secretion. The defective responsiveness of body tissues to insulin almost certainly involves the insulin receptor in cell membranes. In the early stage the predominant abnormality is reduced insulin sensitivity, characterized by elevated levels of insulin in the blood. At this stage hyperglycemia can be reversed by a variety of measures and medications that improve insulin sensitivity or reduce glucose production by the liver. As the disease progresses the impairment of insulin secretion worsens, and therapeutic replacement of insulin often becomes necessary.

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Type 2 diabetes is usually first treated by increasing physical activity, decreasing carbohydrate intake, and losing weight. These can restore insulin sensitivity even when the weight loss is modest, for example around 5 kg (10 to 15 lb), most especially when it is in abdominal fat deposits. It is sometimes possible to achieve long-term, satisfactory glucose control with these measures alone. However, the underlying tendency to insulin resistance is not lost, and so attention to diet, exercise, and weight loss must continue. The usual next step, if necessary, is treatment with oral antidiabetic drugs.

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