Gastric Bypass headache migraine treatment

Most of the time headaches are caused by being dehydrated. Doctors prescribe to stop focusing on over-eating and worry about intake of lots of fluids. Protein obtained from drinking milk also count towards fluid intake. It is challenging every day to drink but it does help reducing headache.

Generally, any of the common pain relievers are usable with the sleeve – indeed that is one of its’ primary advantages over the bypass, which is severely limited in what meds can be used. Some doctors may limit use of NSAIDs, including aspirin, for a time after surgery while others will recommend them for use as soon as the narcotic pain relievers are no longer needed. Some doctors who are still operating under RNY protocols may say that they can never be used, but they have some catching up to do with the rest of the VSG/DS world. Given the wide variety of responses between surgeons, it’s best to check with yours to see what his recommendations are.

An increased dosage of PPI is sometimes recommended with use of NSAIDs with the sleeve to help protect the stomach lining, but we have no where near the sensitivity to them that bypass patients have. There are now some recent studies indicating an increased risk of acetemetiphin (Tylenol) poisening and resultant liver damage due to the over-dependence upon Tylenol as a pain reliever in bypass patients.

Some patients do report minor side-effects in digestion after using tylenol, NSAIDs, advil, motrin, ibuprofen, or aleve.

Headache after Mini-Gastric Bypass (Video)



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Comments

  1. Elley Aberia says:

    Gastric bypass does work but it doesn’t do it on its own (after the first few months anyway). It is your tool and if you use it correctly then you get good results, if you don’t use it correctly then you might get good results for the first 6 months or so and then if you aren’t doing anything to help it along the weightloss will slow and then stop and then if you are still ignoring your tool then regain will start. You would be best served by finding a bariatric surgeon who has plenty of these operations under their belt and ideally one who incorporates dietitians and support groups into their aftercare programs. I encourage you to find another therapist if the one you are using isn’t helping because without figuring out what it is that you are “eating at” you have an increased chance of switching addictions say from food to alcohol, smoking, shopping, gambling or sex. I know what I am talking about here as I switched from food to alcohol and had no idea until I was trying desperately to get sober just how much of an issue it is for us post-ops. I spent 3.5 years before getting sober in 2004 and now I try to warn all I meet about this possibility. Forewarned is forearmed! You will need to find new ways to cope with your emotions, non-destructive ways since if you try to eat at them you will hurt like something is standing on your chest, then you will get sick or pray you could get sick. A good activity is perhaps a brisk walk to blow off steam, take your kids to the park, clean house like a fiend or wash your car, I’m sure you get the point. Try to change something negative into something positive. That is also another reason why support groups help because you can ask these kind of things and get answers and you just might get a friend or an excercise buddy out of the deal. =========MOST IMPORTANT PART ============ Another thing is you have to be committed to the rules of the pouch some of which are as follows: 1) No drinking 30 minutes before or 30 minutes after a meal. 2) Absolutely no drinking with a meal (it washes the food through the pouch which means you will hungrier faster OR it will make you throw up.) 3) When eating divide your plate and eat in this order a) lean protein, b) lettuce or non-starchy veggies, 3) fruit and 4) if there is still room then a little bit of starch or starchy vegetable. 4) Measure your portions out (using a saucer for a plate and a cup for a bowl helps your brain think you are eating more. 5) Chew each bite thoroughly because if you don’t you will end up hurting or sick. 6) No carbonation – check with the surgeon to find out their policy on when or if you can drink a soda again. Some will say never, some will say you have to let it go flat and some see no problem with it if it doesn’t hurt you but better to err on the side of caution. Same rule may apply to coffee – will need to ask the surgeon about that as well. Others are fine with it. 7) Commit to excercise with cardio and toning excercise. 8) Make sure to get in all your protein. Many post-ops years out still drink protein shakes daily or eat a protein bar. 9) Drink a minimum of 8 ounce glasses of water today but preferably more. 10) No alcohol in the beginning. Ask the surgeon for his policy of when or if ever they allow it and bear in mind what I said about transferring addictions. I never had a problem prior to 2000 when I went to replace food with alcohol (unconsciously). Also be aware that should you drink you will get drunk very quickly as the alcohol goes directly to your liver. Post-ops have been arrested for DWI before due to how they were acting when their BAC was less than the legal limit so if you chance it either do so at home with someone around or have a designated driver.

  2. Daniel Graham says:

    Let me say this first and foremost: Gastric bypass surgery is only a TOOL for weight loss, not a cure! Initially, the weight will just fall off. After a few months, the “honeymoon period” comes to an end and one must continue to be committed to exercise and changed eating habits in order to maintain the weight loss, or the weight will, and does, come back! Part of the preparation for gastric bypass is preparing yourself for this lifestyle change. Most good bariatric surgeons require an evaluation by a psychologist or psychiatrist before surgery to make sure you are ready for this life-altering surgery and ready to commit to the changes necessary to make it work. If you have this surgery just to lose weight quickly, you have missed the point completely and should not have this surgery. Sadly, there are a lot of people having this done and the surgeons just operate with no thought to what will happen to this person after the weight has dropped off. The best surgeons will make sure you are prepared by mandating diet classes and even classes with an exercise specialist to get you started and set out on the right path after surgery, before they will even consider scheduling the surgery! In your present state, you are about where I was – (at age 47) I weighed 242 lbs and was 5’1″. I am by no means thin, but weigh a lot less than I did 8 years ago when I had surgery. I do go up and down with about 10 lbs. But I know what to do to lose the weight when I need to, and the biggest thing is to get control of it before it gets beyond that 10 lbs., instead of looking at losing 50 or 100 lbs all over again.

  3. Mary Spicoli says:

    Some never experienced headaches afterward. It does affect a lot of people differently, but if they haven’t subsided, they should definitely get a second opinion. It may be a coincidence that they started at the same time and it may be something more serious. I would have asked surgeon doctor recommend a specialist (a neurologist) or do some more in depth tests to figure out why his patient is having these headaches. Simply giving headache medicines is not right.

  4. Jonathan Martin says:

    My father had a bypass surgery three month ago. After a week of operation he is suffering from headache. The doctor of my father can’t diagonalize the reason. the pain killers are fail to cure him. What should I do now? which kind of specialize I should consult with. Is it a just a post operation side affect or something is serious behind this. someone please assist me giving me advice as soon as possible. This is serious and urgent too.

  5. Daniel Graham says:

    Let me say this first and foremost: Gastric bypass surgery is only a TOOL for weight loss, not a cure! Initially, the weight will just fall off. After a few months, the “honeymoon period” comes to an end and one must continue to be committed to exercise and changed eating habits in order to maintain the weight loss, or the weight will, and does, come back! Part of the preparation for gastric bypass is preparing yourself for this lifestyle change. Most good bariatric surgeons require an evaluation by a psychologist or psychiatrist before surgery to make sure you are ready for this life-altering surgery and ready to commit to the changes necessary to make it work. If you have this surgery just to lose weight quickly, you have missed the point completely and should not have this surgery. Sadly, there are a lot of people having this done and the surgeons just operate with no thought to what will happen to this person after the weight has dropped off. The best surgeons will make sure you are prepared by mandating diet classes and even classes with an exercise specialist to get you started and set out on the right path after surgery, before they will even consider scheduling the surgery! In your present state, you are about where I was – (at age 47) I weighed 242 lbs and was 5’1″. I am by no means thin, but weigh a lot less than I did 8 years ago when I had surgery. I do go up and down with about 10 lbs. But I know what to do to lose the weight when I need to, and the biggest thing is to get control of it before it gets beyond that 10 lbs., instead of looking at losing 50 or 100 lbs all over again.

  6. Jonathan Martin says:

    My father had a bypass surgery three month ago. After a week of operation he is suffering from headache. The doctor of my father can’t diagonalize the reason. the pain killers are fail to cure him. What should I do now? which kind of specialize I should consult with. Is it a just a post operation side affect or something is serious behind this. someone please assist me giving me advice as soon as possible. This is serious and urgent too.

  7. this is F*&$ing gross!!!!!!!!

  8. desaraycobb says:

    is amazes me how some people can be so fucking stupid! if you dont know what its like to be fat, then shut the fuck up!!!

  9. Tinagleason says:

    ok Im not quite sure what he is doing..lol how does this work??

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