Purchase a show ticket for Beauty and the Beast, and you will spend a magical evening. That is a promise! A story passed down from generation to generation had found its way to the stage of Broadway, thanks to Disney. Over the years, Disney has produced many tales fit for children, such as The Lion King, Tarzan, and Mary Poppins on Broadway. These musicals have also made the grown ups re-live their childhood memories of these characters in comics and animations.

This lavish production, now showing at the Lunt-Fontanne Theater was adapted from Disney’s 1991 movie by the same name. Beauty and the Beast debuted on Broadway’s Palace Theater by previewing on March 9, 1994 and opening on April 18, 1994. More than five spectacular years later, the production moved to Lunt-Fontanne Theatre on November 12, 1999, and has been making waves there since then.

Currently, Beauty and the Beast is the 6th longest running musical in the history of Broadway, and has completed 5,176 performances on November 19, 2006. However, it is the third longest currently running musical on Broadway, after The Phantom of the Opera, and the recently revived Les Misérables.

Taking The Bow

This animated version of the Beauty and the Beast, with expanded script and new songs by Alan Menken and Tim Rice, was the first animated movie ever to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. Nominated for nine categories of Tony Awards in 1994, Beauty and the Beast won in one category – Best Costume Design. In addition, it also won the 1994 Theatre World Award.

The Enchanted Story

This is the story of the Beast, who is actually a prince under a spell of an enchantress . . . and this is the story of Beauty, a young beautiful woman named Belle, who agrees to become the Beast’s prisoner forever – in exchange for her father’s life. After Beauty begins to stay at the enchanted castle, the Beast falls in love with her, and as time goes by, becomes less ‘beastly.’

To break the spell cast by the enchantress, Beauty must return the love of the Beast. If not, the prince is doomed to remain a Beast through all eternity.

Tickets For The Show

If you and your family wish to spend a magical and an enchanted evening, this is THE show. Disney has again surpassed itself by producing another great show for the children and adults, alike.

The show ticket for Beauty and the Beast can be obtained from the box office at the Lunt-Fontanne Theater. That is, if you have the time and inclination to spend hours in line for your ticket. Otherwise, you can procure your show ticket for Beauty and the Beast from any of the many reliable ticket brokers in New York.

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Comments

  1. We will be heading to disney world on February 22, 2009 for five days with my three year old little girl. Getting 6 day park hopper tickets (2 days were free). A few things I’m wondering about:

    What rides are must sees for her age? Which rides should be avoided (I know there are height requirements. More concerned with the scare factor)? She is FEARLESS and a bit of a dare devil. She doesn’t scare easily at all but she is still only 2.5 years old (she’ll be 3 days shy of 3 when we go to disney). She’s also very active and can go on and on with boundless energy levels it seems. I have yet to see her drained after a long day of play.

    Bring or rent a stroller? Is it difficult to deal with strollers on trams/monorail? There was no child on our last trip to disney (2004).

    Character dining? Do you need reservations for these or can you walk in? I know Cinderella’s Castle books up within minutes at the 180 day mark but I wasn’t sure about the rest of the character dining experiences.

    Parades and fireworks: I’ve heard horror stories about the aftermath of trying to leave the parks. Any tips on how to avoid the mass rush out after the fireworks are over?

    Weather: I have no clue what the weather is like in late February in Orlando. Our previous trips were during June (OMG the crowds were horrible and it was HOT!). What should I expect and what sort of clothes would be appropriate for this time of year?

    Any other general tips for Disney world with a 3 year old? Thanks in advance for any advice that can be offered!

  2. My family and I are going to New York for a couple of days in December. However, we cannot decide on which Broadway plays we should see. My borther is about 12 years old so, it has to be a play that he would enjoy too. Does anyone know of any good broadway plays playing in December?

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