The Truth About Diabetes

Like all complicated matters there are certain misunderstandings regarding Diabetes.

Today I want to dispel some myths regarding diabetes.

Here is a list of the questions that I will be discussing:
Can get diabetes from someone else?
Eating too much sugar causes diabetes
Type 2 diabetes is mild diabetes
People with diabetes eventually go blind
It’s not safe to drive if you have diabetes
People with diabetes can’t play sport
People with diabetes are more likely to get colds and other illnesses
People with diabetes can’t eat sweets or chocolate
People with diabetes shouldn’t eat bananas or grapes
People with diabetes should eat special diabetic foods

Now for some serious myth bashing…

Can get diabetes from someone else?
Although we don’t know exactly why some people get diabetes, we know that diabetes is not contagious – You cannot get it from others. There is a chance that a person whose parents or brothers and sisters have diabetes might get diabetes, particularly Type 2 diabetes. But lifestyle factors also play a part.

Eating too much sugar causes diabetes
Eating sugar does not cause diabetes. Diabetes is caused by a combination of inherited and lifestyle factors. However, eating a diet high in fat and sugar can cause you to become overweight. Being overweight increases your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, so if you have a history of diabetes in your family, a healthy diet and regular exercise are recommended to control your weight.

Type 2 diabetes is mild diabetes
There is no such thing as mild or borderline diabetes. All diabetes is equally serious, and if not properly controlled can lead to serious complications.

People with diabetes eventually go blind
Although diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people of working age, research has proved you can reduce your chances of developing diabetes complications – such as damage to your eyes – if you:
• Control your blood pressure and glucose levels
• Keep active
• Maintain your ideal body weight
• Give up smoking

It’s not safe to drive if you have diabetes
Providing you are responsible and have good control of your diabetes, research shows that people with diabetes are no less safe on the roads than anyone else. Nevertheless, the myth that people with diabetes are not safe persists

People with diabetes can’t play sport
Pakistan’s famous all-rounder Wasim Akram has diabetes; many other people with diabetes take part in active sports. People with diabetes are encouraged to exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle. Keeping active can help avoid complications associated with diabetes, such as heart disease. There may be some considerations to take into account with your diabetes before taking up a new exercise regime – talk to your doctor for more information.

People with diabetes are more likely to get colds and other illnesses
No. You are no more likely to get a cold or another illness if you’ve got diabetes. However, people with diabetes are advised to get flu vaccinations. This is because any infection interferes with your blood glucose control, putting you at risk of high blood glucose levels and, for those with Type 1 diabetes, an increased risk of ketoacidosis.

People with diabetes can’t eat sweets or chocolate
Sweets and chocolate can be eaten by people with diabetes just like the rest of us, if eaten as part of a healthy diet. Remember that confectionery foods tend to be higher in fat and calories too so for this reason they should be limited especially if you’re trying to lose weight.

People with diabetes shouldn’t eat bananas or grapes
All fruit and vegetables are extremely good for you. Eating more can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, some cancers and some gut problems. You should aim to eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day. This also helps to improve the overall balance of the diet. Eating a variety of different fruit and vegetables ensure you get the maximum benefit.

People with diabetes should eat special diabetic foods
Diabetic versions of foods offer no special benefit. They still raise blood glucose levels, contain just as much fat and calories, are usually more expensive and can also have a laxative effect. The healthy diet for people with diabetes is the same as that recommended for everyone – low in fat, salt and sugar, with meals including starchy foods like bread and pasta and plenty of fruit and vegetables.

2 Responses to The Truth About Diabetes

  1. sick_mick_101 says:

    My Dad has been admitted into hospital for water on his lungs. He has had heaps of tests from blood to biopsy after drainage. All test have come back negative for any heart problem or cancer etc.
    The fluid has returned with a little round his heart also. He has stopped all his meds for other ailments: Diabetes – cholesterol – colitis. His diabetes has got worse he is having insulin and they are giving him antibiotics intravenously. To date they still cannot find the cause.
    Any help much appreciated!

  2. Keegan says:

    I’m going to be 18 years old in September, I’ve had type 1 diabetes for 14 years, I have severe diabetic neuropathy, amplified pain syndrome, fibromyalgia, extreme skin sensitivity, chronic migraines, constant unresolved abdominal pain, chronic back pain and just all around chronic widespread pain. I’ve tried every possible medication for my symptoms yet nothing but narcotics even takes the edge off. 10 MGs of Morphine in the IV lasts for about 15 minutes, percocet lasts for about an hour. I can no longer attend school, I leave the house for less than an hour once (if that) a week and when I’m home, I can only be in bed or on the couch because I physically can’t exert any energy because of this awful pain. I’ve lost over 40 pounds because the pain does not allow me to keep food down or have an appetite. I have a pain doctor that knows all of my issues that treats cancer and RA patients and seems to have no sympathy for the pain I’m in because he deals with the worst case scenarios. Based on my health issues (Not on my age), would I qualify for even a low dose narcotic as part of a pain management treatment regimen? And if so, should I try to get a new pain management doctor?
    I understand that FS is over-diagnosed but that’s not what I’m asking. Just clearing that up.

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